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Author Topic: Learn to rehab  (Read 10683 times)

Offline aubs129

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Learn to rehab
« on: October 11, 2005, 10:54:13 pm »

Hi,

Are there any books, courses, or even classes one could take to learn basic rehabbing skills? I would really like to learn invaluable "home-fixing" techniques like window replacement, wood working, fixing sinks etc...I can paint a wall, but where I can I learn other aspects to getting a distressed property in better shape. I would like to use contractors as well (in fact, would it be better to get them for most of the work or even all? Would that save more money?) but really want to learn to do a lot of the work myself.....

Offline davnic4

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2005, 12:28:55 am »
I am new to the forum, but if there is one thing I learned so far from the all the wisdom here: Pay professionals for the professional jobs (i.e. plumbing, electrical, carpentry).

If you can paint a wall, great, stick to painting. If you need to re-wire a house so its up to code, call an electrician. It will save you time and money in the long run.

Offline carlosguti

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2005, 02:22:35 am »
I cannot recommend a course because I never had a course in flxing up, but I just got done with a book from the local library. it called fix and flip or something like that, im sure you can find great books for free in your local library.

Offline kdhastedt

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2005, 07:31:39 am »

Try your local trade school or community college -- most offer courses in the trades, they are usually reasonably priced, and you might even get some college credits!

Keith
I have CDO...it's like OCD but in alphabetical order - the way it should be!

Offline rhm76384

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2005, 12:02:44 pm »
Hey,
     See if there is a local Habitat for Humanity chapter in your area. Ours is always building a house, looking for volunteers and you can help build one from the ground up and learn lots of things.
Peace,
Richard
Richard Manlove
Success Property Solutions, LLC
1-877-561-FAST/www.noproblemman.com
For cheaper Texas electricity plus income:
http://manlovepartners.igniteinc.biz

Offline kdhastedt

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2005, 12:47:53 pm »

Good point, Richard and it does GREAT things for the community!

Keith
I have CDO...it's like OCD but in alphabetical order - the way it should be!

Offline masoning

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2005, 03:42:57 pm »
Rehabbing cannot be learned from a book!!!!

The way I learned was to do a major rehab and I had a fulltime lead carpenter on my payroll.  He and I and the resy of my crew were doing two 3000sq ft buildings that were next door to each other at the same time. He was with me for two years fulltime until we parted ways.

What I did while we were rehabbing those two buildings for resale,was to buy a small building that I was going to be the lead carpenter and run the rehab.  I hired another crew of three guys.  We gutted the building and built it back until just before the drywall phase.  Then I sold it.

Now, 2 years later and many rehabs later I can run my own crews and make decisions without the help of others.  However, I still run things or techniques by colleagues.  I also go into dozens of buildings every month to learn other techniques.

Offline Baloo

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2005, 10:38:24 pm »
I was lucky enough to get into tile setting and cabinetry at a young age.  I find most people are handy or they are not.  Its like gardening and cooking, you can try and learn it and might be fair at it, but if it doesnt just click...

The best way is experience.  Pull something apart and fix it.  Faucets and toilets and such are always a good place to start.  I know Home Depot and Lowes will often have a schedule of free classes that will show you some basics such as installing a vanity or a tub surround.

Leave the stull like the hard plumbing and electrical to the profesionals.  And somethings like windows and carpeting are sometimes more economical in the long run to hire out.  For example the house I just bought needs all new windows, about 16 total.  I could save about 1,000 - 1,400 by installing them myself, but it would take me 2 or 3 weekends.  I would rather hire a team to do it for me in one weekend and free me up to work on something else.  In the end it will save me close to a month in additional carrying costs which is almost 1/2 of the installation.  And if I mess up a window, I have to pay to replace it, If they mess up a window it's on them.

Good luck

Offline JeffInCT

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #8 on: October 13, 2005, 04:07:36 pm »
Go to Home Depot and buy that 30.00 book they have.  It tells you how to fix, repair or replace just about anything.  It has detailed instructions, pictures and all kind of good information.

Bring it home, put it next to your toilet and read it every time you take a dump.  If it doesn't scare you away from rehabbing, then you have won half the battle.

I like the part where it tells you how long it will take to do the job based on your experience or skill level.

In my case it would take 23 years for a rehab.  Calculate those holding costs.    ;D

But seriosly, the book is interesting.
I am a student of Carelton Sheets no money down technique. I always like to hear from other Sheets students. http://www.jyrentals.com

Offline darrenjzy

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2005, 07:33:56 pm »
thats where i do my best REI reading.  But the library keeps kicking me out of the bathroom :'(

My library has a plethra of "how-to" books.  You know the good ones by the work stains on them.  Yeah, i always see that big orange HomeDepot book by the entrance.  I outta check it out.
One of these days I'll be answering questions instead of asking them.

Offline TamiSpartan

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2005, 01:02:47 pm »
I like the part where it tells you how long it will take to do the job based on your experience or skill level.

In my case it would take 23 years for a rehab.  Calculate those holding costs.    ;D


This is a delightful post! As I sit here today listening to the crew tear out all the grout in my kitchen, bath, hall and foyer because of their screw up -- I'm reminded it's always best to pay the professionals when you know you're out of your league. I would really hate to be doing what they are today (instead I get to sit here and post while I babysit my house). I am out of my league for most heavy-duty work.

I can do the small stuff myself, painting; faucet and toilet installation; lighting and ceiling fan installation; drywall repairs (if an entire human didn't go through the wall); and I've even put in a garbage disposal. But that is where I draw the line. BTW I taught that stuff to myself because I watched the guys I've paid over the years and figured if they could do it, I certainly could.

Habitat for Humanity was a stellar idea btw -- that is an excellent way to learn. I think I will do that myself.
~Tami

Offline black95gt

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2005, 02:26:44 pm »
the best way is experience.  Ive done two rehabs now and to be honest, on the first one i had never even painted a wall before. But i am the type that will try something if seems easy enough.  Most everything in rehabs is just commen sense type stuff.  If you know how to use a tape measure, run a saw, use a level......you got most of it licked.  Like i said, ive taught myself about everything that i know, but i have also had to redo things over 2 or 3 times.  Sure it cost me some money, but i guarentee that money that i spent 2 or 3 times was better than paying a contractor to do it, for the fact that i know how now.  The only things i hire out is water hook ups and furnace repairs. ( I dont mess with gas)  I always try the water hook up once, but if it leaks, then i call the plumber.  The electric is all pretty easy work as well, at least as far as replacing fixtures and outlets.  Another source that i use now if i have never done the particular task is, i goto the Lowes website and they have how-to instructions on about everything.  I read through that and then go try it.


Offline JeffInCT

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #12 on: October 14, 2005, 03:10:53 pm »
I have somehow networked into some very inexpensive labor here in CT.  I re-habbed a condo with a cell phone and American Express card.   And I always go to ebay to buy my coupon for 10% off at Lowes Home Improvement  before I shop. 5 bucks saves me hundreds of dollars.

You can view after pictures of my latest condo rehab at

 www.jyrentals.com

It's the one highlighted in yellow. Don't laugh at my web design abilites.
I am a student of Carelton Sheets no money down technique. I always like to hear from other Sheets students. http://www.jyrentals.com

Offline kdhastedt

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2005, 03:15:53 pm »

Looks like a solid, neat job, Jeff!

I'm retired military and get 10% off at Lowes...but ya gotta ask!

Keith
I have CDO...it's like OCD but in alphabetical order - the way it should be!

Offline JeffInCT

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Re:Learn to rehab
« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2005, 03:27:39 pm »
Thanks, Keith.

For the compliment and for being in the military.

I am a student of Carelton Sheets no money down technique. I always like to hear from other Sheets students. http://www.jyrentals.com

 




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