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Author Topic: Where to get the money?  (Read 13239 times)

Offline jfpen

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #15 on: November 18, 2011, 03:57:05 pm »
Procrastinating is not what is going on. Things are a lot tougher  where I am and it is getting worse with unemployment still going up. I have been looking for other jobs for quite some time now ever since the economy got bad.  It is usually the same thing like these. I don't have years work experience. We're not hiring. Thank you for applying at  such and such, unfortuantely we have chosen another candidate who is more qualified. Thank you for coming we will call you if you are a good fit for the job. That's after I have been to the job interview. They never call back and when I contact them to check on the status of my application or whether they reviewed my resume, they had already filled the job I was applying for without so much as a letter or email telling me I got rejected. It just goes on and on with them looking for reasons not to give me a shot at the job. Even if I am willing to learn the ropes on an entry-level position. I am the kind of person that does not like to wait and wait for an answer as to me getting the job or not. I prefer everything to be upfront no beating around the bush. When I leave that interview I want to know right then and there either they want me or not. I am sure they be knowing the whole entire time during the interview if I got the job or not and won't tell me upfront. This is so frustrating and a waste of my time while getting my hopes up for nothing.
Quote
I can tell you there were times I was willing to take any job just to get hired. Then after that happens I had plans to find jobs related to my degree that I can go after now that I am in the door. It seems a lot easier to apply for a job within another department in that company than applying for that same job as an outsider.

Then make it happen. Quit procrastinating. Any income is better than no income at this point. If you are looking for a "get rich quick" solution, real estate is not it.  It can become very profitable, but that takes time.  It sounds like "time" is something that you do not have.

Many of the investors on this site started with nothing or very little and worked hard to reach the levels that they are at now.  Success is all about what you are willing to invest in your future.

Set your goals. Then plan your work and work your plan to get there. If that means2, 3 even 4 odd jobs, then that is what it is going to take.

Do whatever it takes. 


tbodley,
              Are you lazy or afraid of actually being successful? You are not ready for real estate investing. At least not now. I was in a similar position as you are now. Although, I never whined. The people on this board are giving you good advice. All you have to do is act!


This is clipped from a post that was in response to a post like yours. This is before I purchased my first property.


                        I'm a newbie to real estate investing and have been actively making offers for my first property for the last couple of months.  I'm sure my story is not unlike others here.
                        At one time, I was a financial mess. I had a bunch of credit card debt and bad credit. Like yourself, I thought that real estate investing could get me out of trouble. I bought the Carleton Sheets course.  I soon learned that I had to get my financial house in order before that could happen.
      The turning point for me was purchasing some Rich Dad books and cd's. I learned my lifestyle had to change.
       I scaled my spending back to a bare minimum. I found the cheapest apartment I could find. It was $425/mo. It had 3 rooms; a bedroom, a kitchen and bathroom with a shower and toilet (no sink). I had no cable TV or a fancy cell phone. I lived on Ramen noodles and drove a POS car. I took a job in the industry I work in now and freelanced/moonlighted on nights and weekends. I didn't get paid much but I started paying down my debt and repairing my credit. I was miserable at that job but I was making slowly making progress. Then, I got laid off from that job. In hindsight, that was the single best thing that ever happend to me!
        I now work for myself and have paid off all of my debt. My vehicles and equipment for work are paid for. I have "0" debt and have ample savings to start investing and have reserves for a rainy day. It took some time and sacrifice for me just to get to the point of being able to invest. The CPA I use for my small business has a real estate brokerage as well. I'm working with a great agent who is also an appraiser and investor.  She understands exactly what I'm interested in and has actually talked me out of properties that weren't good for me. Conversely, she has brought properties to my attention that I'd have overlooked. I view this as the start of my "team".  This is my starting point for investing.
        For education,  I would read or listen to Rich Dad, Poor Dad and The Millionare Next Door. I just downloaded propertymanager's book and read the first half of it in one sitting. In a word, it's SOBERING! I recommend it.     
         My advice to you is to get control of your business and finances by making whatever changes are necessary. Get a realistic view of where you are and where you will be if you don't change anything!  Adjust your lifestyle and live well within your means. Repair and monitor your credit and build up some savings. Then go at it!!

JP


You know what you need to do. You just have to actually do it.


Offline jfpen

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #16 on: November 18, 2011, 04:02:14 pm »
Maybe I should scare them into giving me a job who knows if that would help. But seriuosly, it is tough competing for a job when you are not in the same room as the next person. There is no telling what that person said or did to get them the job. I wish employers would give group interviews where they group many of the job seekers in one room and one by one they start interviewing them all right in front of the other job candidates. That would be cool, but a lot of pressure.  This gives each person a chance to find out upfront what to say and how to act and what not to say and how to act. At least this gives a person a chance to see if the company is biased in anyway based on the questions they ask at the interviews. I thought it about that once whether the employers are asking each job seeker the same questions as the next person. For all we know there could be some form of discrimination going on at these places that a lot of people never even knew about.
[#msg251285 date=1321644998]
Gotta get more aggressive, creative.  What makes YOU more valuable to a prospective employer than the next guy/girl that walks in the door? 

So do you have anything producing income at the moment?
[/quote]

tbodley,
            You need to be excellent at interviewing. The most qualified person doesn't always get the job. The candidate with the best interview does. Buy the interview mastery DVD and learn it. Stop Whining!!!


http://www.interviewmastery.com/orders.cfm

JP

Offline tbodley74

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #17 on: November 18, 2011, 04:31:19 pm »
Is this story about you Jfpen or someone else? Whoever this person is that wrote this, what type of business they have. I see where it says this person is self employed.
Procrastinating is not what is going on. Things are a lot tougher  where I am and it is getting worse with unemployment still going up. I have been looking for other jobs for quite some time now ever since the economy got bad.  It is usually the same thing like these. I don't have years work experience. We're not hiring. Thank you for applying at  such and such, unfortuantely we have chosen another candidate who is more qualified. Thank you for coming we will call you if you are a good fit for the job. That's after I have been to the job interview. They never call back and when I contact them to check on the status of my application or whether they reviewed my resume, they had already filled the job I was applying for without so much as a letter or email telling me I got rejected. It just goes on and on with them looking for reasons not to give me a shot at the job. Even if I am willing to learn the ropes on an entry-level position. I am the kind of person that does not like to wait and wait for an answer as to me getting the job or not. I prefer everything to be upfront no beating around the bush. When I leave that interview I want to know right then and there either they want me or not. I am sure they be knowing the whole entire time during the interview if I got the job or not and won't tell me upfront. This is so frustrating and a waste of my time while getting my hopes up for nothing.
Quote
I can tell you there were times I was willing to take any job just to get hired. Then after that happens I had plans to find jobs related to my degree that I can go after now that I am in the door. It seems a lot easier to apply for a job within another department in that company than applying for that same job as an outsider.

Then make it happen. Quit procrastinating. Any income is better than no income at this point. If you are looking for a "get rich quick" solution, real estate is not it.  It can become very profitable, but that takes time.  It sounds like "time" is something that you do not have.

Many of the investors on this site started with nothing or very little and worked hard to reach the levels that they are at now.  Success is all about what you are willing to invest in your future.

Set your goals. Then plan your work and work your plan to get there. If that means2, 3 even 4 odd jobs, then that is what it is going to take.

Do whatever it takes. 


tbodley,
              Are you lazy or afraid of actually being successful? You are not ready for real estate investing. At least not now. I was in a similar position as you are now. Although, I never whined. The people on this board are giving you good advice. All you have to do is act!


This is clipped from a post that was in response to a post like yours. This is before I purchased my first property.


                        I'm a newbie to real estate investing and have been actively making offers for my first property for the last couple of months.  I'm sure my story is not unlike others here.
                        At one time, I was a financial mess. I had a bunch of credit card debt and bad credit. Like yourself, I thought that real estate investing could get me out of trouble. I bought the Carleton Sheets course.  I soon learned that I had to get my financial house in order before that could happen.
      The turning point for me was purchasing some Rich Dad books and cd's. I learned my lifestyle had to change.
       I scaled my spending back to a bare minimum. I found the cheapest apartment I could find. It was $425/mo. It had 3 rooms; a bedroom, a kitchen and bathroom with a shower and toilet (no sink). I had no cable TV or a fancy cell phone. I lived on Ramen noodles and drove a POS car. I took a job in the industry I work in now and freelanced/moonlighted on nights and weekends. I didn't get paid much but I started paying down my debt and repairing my credit. I was miserable at that job but I was making slowly making progress. Then, I got laid off from that job. In hindsight, that was the single best thing that ever happend to me!
        I now work for myself and have paid off all of my debt. My vehicles and equipment for work are paid for. I have "0" debt and have ample savings to start investing and have reserves for a rainy day. It took some time and sacrifice for me just to get to the point of being able to invest. The CPA I use for my small business has a real estate brokerage as well. I'm working with a great agent who is also an appraiser and investor.  She understands exactly what I'm interested in and has actually talked me out of properties that weren't good for me. Conversely, she has brought properties to my attention that I'd have overlooked. I view this as the start of my "team".  This is my starting point for investing.
        For education,  I would read or listen to Rich Dad, Poor Dad and The Millionare Next Door. I just downloaded propertymanager's book and read the first half of it in one sitting. In a word, it's SOBERING! I recommend it.     
         My advice to you is to get control of your business and finances by making whatever changes are necessary. Get a realistic view of where you are and where you will be if you don't change anything!  Adjust your lifestyle and live well within your means. Repair and monitor your credit and build up some savings. Then go at it!!

JP


You know what you need to do. You just have to actually do it.



Offline Mdhaas

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #18 on: November 18, 2011, 07:20:56 pm »
Quote
Is this story about you Jfpen or someone else? Whoever this person is that wrote this, what type of business they have. I see where it says this person is self employed.

What difference does that make?  YOU need to have YOUR story.  Quit finding reasons why you CAN'T do it and DO IT.

Who cares if you have been to 100 interviews?  The 101st may be the one that hires you!

There are plenty of jobs out there. They may not be in the field that you want. They may not pay what you want.  But there are jobs.  Get it set in your mind that you will find one and get going!!
If at first you don't succeed.....................skydiving is not for you

Offline justin0419

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #19 on: November 18, 2011, 07:34:13 pm »
There are plenty of people out there who have degrees in something completely unrelated to their current job.  I really feel like getting a degree is more about the fact that you're trainable, halfway intelligent, and know how to show commitment to something.  Sure Doctors, CPAs, etc have degrees in their areas, but the majority of military pilots I work with don't have aerospace engineering degrees.  You are right about how it took me awhile to get to where I am now.  My first full year in the military, I made around 18k.  There are definitely roadblocks up front getting started with rentals.  I talked to a bank today about 8 units.  The banker asked what experience my wife and I had in REI.  After I told him how many units we had and that we'd been doing it since 2007, he was more than happy to work with us. 
If you like rock music, check out www.Lynamsucks.com
New EP titled "Halfway to Hell" is now available!
Check out the merch store on Lynam's website.

Offline tbodley74

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #20 on: November 18, 2011, 10:58:08 pm »
I had the same idea a degree would better my chances at getting hired compared to someone with only a high school diploma or GED. That's not enough anymore because now employers are demanding work experience upfront. This gets complicated for new grads just coming out of schools. Is there anyway for new grads to have many years work experience in the beginning, if they do not get the work experience? I doubt that too. 
There are plenty of people out there who have degrees in something completely unrelated to their current job.  I really feel like getting a degree is more about the fact that you're trainable, halfway intelligent, and know how to show commitment to something.  Sure Doctors, CPAs, etc have degrees in their areas, but the majority of military pilots I work with don't have aerospace engineering degrees.  You are right about how it took me awhile to get to where I am now.  My first full year in the military, I made around 18k.  There are definitely roadblocks up front getting started with rentals.  I talked to a bank today about 8 units.  The banker asked what experience my wife and I had in REI.  After I told him how many units we had and that we'd been doing it since 2007, he was more than happy to work with us. 

Offline justin0419

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #21 on: November 19, 2011, 12:31:02 am »
Some programs let you intern as a student.  It can stretch out the college experience by a couple semesters, but at least people have a little experience to list upon graduation.  My guess is you might have to take more of an entry level position in a field to gain that experience first.  Have you tried gov't jobs at the state or federal level? 
If you like rock music, check out www.Lynamsucks.com
New EP titled "Halfway to Hell" is now available!
Check out the merch store on Lynam's website.

Offline andydallas

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #22 on: November 19, 2011, 06:43:26 am »
tbodley, I think the thing you need to concentrate on is how can you do things, now why you can't.

I don't mean to "cut you down" by saying that, most people today seem to be in the "I can't do it because xxxxxx" mentality, I think you will find the people on this board that are successful do it by figuring out what they can do, not what they can't.

If you've ever heard the serenity prayer (not getting into religion here, just what the prayer says), basically accept the things I can't change, courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

You can't change the fact that you won't have an answer when you leave a job interview, you can  change how you present yourself,,,,you can't change if you didn't get a certain job, you can change if you respond by not doing anything or by applying to 20 different jobs.

In many,, if not most jobs your attitude during the interview is the most important factor, they wouldn't ask you in for an interview if you didn't have the credentials on your resume they were looking for.

Now, have you looked into getting a paper route early in the morning to add income (they make more money than you think), holidays are here, lots of places will be adding retail sales/stockers for nights and weekends,,,its up to you,,,,so please, ask questions about how to do things, stop complaining because its not easy,,,

Finding the money to start real estate investing is never easy, I don't think most of us started with a fat bank account, but we found a way to put together enough to get that first property.

only you can control your attitude
« Last Edit: November 19, 2011, 07:10:24 am by andydallas »

Offline davewindsor

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #23 on: November 19, 2011, 04:37:41 pm »
I had the same idea a degree would better my chances at getting hired compared to someone with only a high school diploma or GED. That's not enough anymore because now employers are demanding work experience upfront. This gets complicated for new grads just coming out of schools. Is there anyway for new grads to have many years work experience in the beginning, if they do not get the work experience? I doubt that too. 


There are always jobs out there. 

How about applying to the government sector?  Join the military and then transfer to your field.  Apply to be a cop and transfer.  Apply to the civil service.  Apply to the IRS.

How about being a labourer in the oilfields like Alaska, on an oil rig or some remote area.  I heard guys were putting 90k a year in their pocket and then came back after five years and bought an apartment building.  They put you up in company work camps in remote areas with fairly cheap room and board and you can save and come back and invest in real estate.

How about cold calling as an independent contractor.  I can't remember if you mentioned you had an accounting degree.  I think it was you.  If so, why not call up small businesses in the phone book and offer your services as a part-time book keeper (if you've got an accounting degree).

How about getting a trucking license?  They're always hiring truckers and people who can use heavy machinery.  I talked to a flat bed owner-operator who said he was pulling in like $300K a year.  Granted, you've got to deduct your tractor expenses, but still at the end of the day you've got money you can save and invest in real estate later.

How about being a marine merchant like Rich Dad?  You work as a crewsman on cargo ships moving cargo around the world or a crewsman on an oil tanker.

You've got to think outside the box.  Obviously, what you're doing is not working.  You've got to make some drastic changes.
Landlord and investor

Offline jfpen

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #24 on: November 19, 2011, 09:20:47 pm »
Is this story about you Jfpen or someone else? Whoever this person is that wrote this, what type of business they have. I see where it says this person is self employed.
Procrastinating is not what is going on. Things are a lot tougher  where I am and it is getting worse with unemployment still going up. I have been looking for other jobs for quite some time now ever since the economy got bad.  It is usually the same thing like these. I don't have years work experience. We're not hiring. Thank you for applying at  such and such, unfortuantely we have chosen another candidate who is more qualified. Thank you for coming we will call you if you are a good fit for the job. That's after I have been to the job interview. They never call back and when I contact them to check on the status of my application or whether they reviewed my resume, they had already filled the job I was applying for without so much as a letter or email telling me I got rejected. It just goes on and on with them looking for reasons not to give me a shot at the job. Even if I am willing to learn the ropes on an entry-level position. I am the kind of person that does not like to wait and wait for an answer as to me getting the job or not. I prefer everything to be upfront no beating around the bush. When I leave that interview I want to know right then and there either they want me or not. I am sure they be knowing the whole entire time during the interview if I got the job or not and won't tell me upfront. This is so frustrating and a waste of my time while getting my hopes up for nothing.
Quote
I can tell you there were times I was willing to take any job just to get hired. Then after that happens I had plans to find jobs related to my degree that I can go after now that I am in the door. It seems a lot easier to apply for a job within another department in that company than applying for that same job as an outsider.

Then make it happen. Quit procrastinating. Any income is better than no income at this point. If you are looking for a "get rich quick" solution, real estate is not it.  It can become very profitable, but that takes time.  It sounds like "time" is something that you do not have.

Many of the investors on this site started with nothing or very little and worked hard to reach the levels that they are at now.  Success is all about what you are willing to invest in your future.

Set your goals. Then plan your work and work your plan to get there. If that means2, 3 even 4 odd jobs, then that is what it is going to take.

Do whatever it takes. 


tbodley,
              Are you lazy or afraid of actually being successful? You are not ready for real estate investing. At least not now. I was in a similar position as you are now. Although, I never whined. The people on this board are giving you good advice. All you have to do is act!


This is clipped from a post that was in response to a post like yours. This is before I purchased my first property.


                        I'm a newbie to real estate investing and have been actively making offers for my first property for the last couple of months.  I'm sure my story is not unlike others here.
                        At one time, I was a financial mess. I had a bunch of credit card debt and bad credit. Like yourself, I thought that real estate investing could get me out of trouble. I bought the Carleton Sheets course.  I soon learned that I had to get my financial house in order before that could happen.
      The turning point for me was purchasing some Rich Dad books and cd's. I learned my lifestyle had to change.
       I scaled my spending back to a bare minimum. I found the cheapest apartment I could find. It was $425/mo. It had 3 rooms; a bedroom, a kitchen and bathroom with a shower and toilet (no sink). I had no cable TV or a fancy cell phone. I lived on Ramen noodles and drove a POS car. I took a job in the industry I work in now and freelanced/moonlighted on nights and weekends. I didn't get paid much but I started paying down my debt and repairing my credit. I was miserable at that job but I was making slowly making progress. Then, I got laid off from that job. In hindsight, that was the single best thing that ever happend to me!
        I now work for myself and have paid off all of my debt. My vehicles and equipment for work are paid for. I have "0" debt and have ample savings to start investing and have reserves for a rainy day. It took some time and sacrifice for me just to get to the point of being able to invest. The CPA I use for my small business has a real estate brokerage as well. I'm working with a great agent who is also an appraiser and investor.  She understands exactly what I'm interested in and has actually talked me out of properties that weren't good for me. Conversely, she has brought properties to my attention that I'd have overlooked. I view this as the start of my "team".  This is my starting point for investing.
        For education,  I would read or listen to Rich Dad, Poor Dad and The Millionare Next Door. I just downloaded propertymanager's book and read the first half of it in one sitting. In a word, it's SOBERING! I recommend it.     
         My advice to you is to get control of your business and finances by making whatever changes are necessary. Get a realistic view of where you are and where you will be if you don't change anything!  Adjust your lifestyle and live well within your means. Repair and monitor your credit and build up some savings. Then go at it!!

JP


You know what you need to do. You just have to actually do it.



tbodley,
            Yes, this is my story. What's funny is that even though it was a tough time in my life, I never felt that way when I was going through it.  I was too busy doing the things necessary to better my position to have feelings of self-pity. And, I also don't think I'm some hero for taking control of a situation that I was mostly to blame for creating.  For some reason, you think someone owes you something, as if you are entitled to decent job because you completed a degree program. You are not. You are entitled to the pursuit of happiness.  So things are not how you planned. Now you have to adapt. If you are going to be successful you have got to remove negative people from influencing you.  They will suck the energy out of you.
             
            Is it true that you have a degree in accounting?

JP

Offline tbodley74

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #25 on: November 26, 2011, 10:40:58 am »
Yes I tried all of that.  I was not qualified for the job even for entry level  work.
Some programs let you intern as a student.  It can stretch out the college experience by a couple semesters, but at least people have a little experience to list upon graduation.  My guess is you might have to take more of an entry level position in a field to gain that experience first.  Have you tried gov't jobs at the state or federal level? 

Offline bossladyjack

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #26 on: December 03, 2011, 12:01:48 pm »
Hi tbodley! Still no job huh?  Alright, first, just get a job. I have my degree in business, solid work history in property management blah blah blah. I interview really well, I'm a stand up citizen and I have never had trouble getting a job. Generally I walk in through the door of wherever I want to work and get hired.

...But that hasn't been working lately.  This is a different work environment because of the recession.  People that have jobs are sitting on them, and working harder and better so they can keep them.  It's tough to get a job because nobody is moving around.

 When I moved last year, it took me 3 months to find a job. I mean out every morning with a plan, looking sharp, resume in hand, looking for a job. It was discouraging. After a particularly tough day of being turned down, I went to a dealership to drive the new Challenger for fun, just to lift my spirits.  I ended up selling cars for 9 months, because it was the first place that said they'd give me a job. (Great place to pick up skills on selling)

At that dealership I met the one I'm with now, sold my house and moved across the state to live with him. Same thing, spent 3 months looking for a job in a city 10 times the size of the one I was in. I'm waitressing now! But I'm happy because...IT'S A JOB. And it's at a winery so I get 40% off wine ;). My lil waitressing job gave me enough dough to get me through real estate school in a month and a half and when you want something really bad, you work really hard for it. I just passed my exam with a 91% national, 88% state, and sent off my license application this week.  I signed on working for a real estate company that specializes in foreclosures, to gain experience slowly but surely in investing, while waitressing. I'll probably work at HR Block during the tax season just to get by (and learn about taxes).

Tbodley, lower your standards, go push carts at Walmart. If you just have a job, you will be bringing something in. It will feel good, and it will open doors.

And second, you don't need money to buy a house. Not in this market. You will need money to pay for that house during vacant periods (that's where the job comes in...). So many people are just about to enter the foreclosure process, you can probably find houses where you can assume the mortgage, and they will be thrilled to not have their credit whacked by losing their house.  The rental market is fantastic, so go get your rental. Start hunting tbodley, I'm not experienced enough to tell you step by step what to do, but the opportunity is there. You just have to go for it.  Nobody really knows what they're doing anyway, everyone pretty much wings it and makes mistakes till they learn. You just have to be brave.

Offline tbodley74

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #27 on: December 06, 2011, 10:38:43 pm »
I tried the IRS and that did not work either. I really wanted to join the military. I looked into joining the Navy. I like what they had to offer, plus I would have liked to travel. They told me I would not be qualifed to join because of my health.

How would I go about applying to laboring jobs in Alaska? I live down south and I wouldn't know who to contact for me to apply for jobs out of state like Alaska of all places.  Any ideas how I do that now that you brought it up? I don't have any work experience doing labor work in an oil field. We don't have stuff like that down here in Alabama. They don't even train for that kind of work down here of course seeing we don't have oilfields. I believe I discovered one good reason, which could be the main reason why I am not getting these jobs is because of my embarrassing work history. At least it looks embarrassing to me compared to what they are looking for. None of my jobs were ever serious career jobs that required skills. My jobs were all low wage jobs even a high school dropout could get.

Could I work from home as an independent cold calling contractor? If so, what all I need to do a cold calling contractor's job?

There are two things I need to get my bookkeeping business started where I could work from home. I need to come up with the money to pay for my business license and I need to come up with the money to buy the accounting software, which is not cheap. I have been playing around with my old outdated accounting software as practice if I was able to do bookkeeping for a real company. My computer has been running bad lately, which could ruin everything when doing the books for small businesses. With aaccounting there is no room for errors. The slightest mistake could ruin a business financially. That is why I want to make sure I got a good working computer and the right software to do the job. I was all set to go sign up for trucking, but then I got discouraged  by a relative who  said it is not as easy as it seems. That and I had a car wreck a few years ago after dosing off at the wheel for one split second. Thatr scared me away from the trucking gig. How in the world is a flat bed operator making $300k a year?
I had the same idea a degree would better my chances at getting hired compared to someone with only a high school diploma or GED. That's not enough anymore because now employers are demanding work experience upfront. This gets complicated for new grads just coming out of schools. Is there anyway for new grads to have many years work experience in the beginning, if they do not get the work experience? I doubt that too. 


There are always jobs out there. 

How about applying to the government sector?  Join the military and then transfer to your field.  Apply to be a cop and transfer.  Apply to the civil service.  Apply to the IRS.

How about being a labourer in the oilfields like Alaska, on an oil rig or some remote area.  I heard guys were putting 90k a year in their pocket and then came back after five years and bought an apartment building.  They put you up in company work camps in remote areas with fairly cheap room and board and you can save and come back and invest in real estate.

How about cold calling as an independent contractor.  I can't remember if you mentioned you had an accounting degree.  I think it was you.  If so, why not call up small businesses in the phone book and offer your services as a part-time book keeper (if you've got an accounting degree).

How about getting a trucking license?  They're always hiring truckers and people who can use heavy machinery.  I talked to a flat bed owner-operator who said he was pulling in like $300K a year.  Granted, you've got to deduct your tractor expenses, but still at the end of the day you've got money you can save and invest in real estate later.

How about being a marine merchant like Rich Dad?  You work as a crewsman on cargo ships moving cargo around the world or a crewsman on an oil tanker.

You've got to think outside the box.  Obviously, what you're doing is not working.  You've got to make some drastic changes.

Offline tbodley74

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #28 on: December 06, 2011, 11:55:16 pm »
Hi Bossladyjack. Nope I don't have a better job yet. I am still pushing carts at Wal-Mart. I can't take that place anymore. They suck at how they run their business, which is so unfair. I have been trying to escape ever since and still find myself stuck. I do have an idea, but I don't know if it is a great strategy to get jobs. I contacted someone from my local career center job website explaining all the problems I am having with finding a job.  I am at a point where maybe I need to look at job hunting in a whole new way. How does this sound? Instead of me constantly applying for jobs the same way most job seekers always do, I would quit looking for jobs and start looking for help. I am talking about one on one networking with someone who can guide me in the right direction to get me hired quickly and maybe even use their connections with employers to get me in the door. Everything else has failed up to this point, no matter what I did. I am like you in a way where my interviwing skills were not bad and my resume looked good enough for me to get called in for an interview. Making money using my skills for small businesses is not a bad option either. By the way, congratulations on scoring that 91% on your exam.
Hi tbodley! Still no job huh?  Alright, first, just get a job. I have my degree in business, solid work history in property management blah blah blah. I interview really well, I'm a stand up citizen and I have never had trouble getting a job. Generally I walk in through the door of wherever I want to work and get hired.

...But that hasn't been working lately.  This is a different work environment because of the recession.  People that have jobs are sitting on them, and working harder and better so they can keep them.  It's tough to get a job because nobody is moving around.

 When I moved last year, it took me 3 months to find a job. I mean out every morning with a plan, looking sharp, resume in hand, looking for a job. It was discouraging. After a particularly tough day of being turned down, I went to a dealership to drive the new Challenger for fun, just to lift my spirits.  I ended up selling cars for 9 months, because it was the first place that said they'd give me a job. (Great place to pick up skills on selling)

At that dealership I met the one I'm with now, sold my house and moved across the state to live with him. Same thing, spent 3 months looking for a job in a city 10 times the size of the one I was in. I'm waitressing now! But I'm happy because...IT'S A JOB. And it's at a winery so I get 40% off wine ;). My lil waitressing job gave me enough dough to get me through real estate school in a month and a half and when you want something really bad, you work really hard for it. I just passed my exam with a 91% national, 88% state, and sent off my license application this week.  I signed on working for a real estate company that specializes in foreclosures, to gain experience slowly but surely in investing, while waitressing. I'll probably work at HR Block during the tax season just to get by (and learn about taxes).

Tbodley, lower your standards, go push carts at Walmart. If you just have a job, you will be bringing something in. It will feel good, and it will open doors.

And second, you don't need money to buy a house. Not in this market. You will need money to pay for that house during vacant periods (that's where the job comes in...). So many people are just about to enter the foreclosure process, you can probably find houses where you can assume the mortgage, and they will be thrilled to not have their credit whacked by losing their house.  The rental market is fantastic, so go get your rental. Start hunting tbodley, I'm not experienced enough to tell you step by step what to do, but the opportunity is there. You just have to go for it.  Nobody really knows what they're doing anyway, everyone pretty much wings it and makes mistakes till they learn. You just have to be brave.

Offline justin0419

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Re: Where to get the money?
« Reply #29 on: December 07, 2011, 12:01:33 am »
With aaccounting there is no room for errors.
:biggrin
The flatbed owner operator could possibly be bringing in 300k/yr gross, but there are tons of expenses in trucking.  Fuel costs will eat up a third of his profits.  Then throw in things like tires (200-400 a piece depending on if they're capped or virgin rubber) and insurance.  Insurance can run about $600/month.  The people who contract the load will usually take a 15-20% cut too.  Everything with a semi costs big bucks to fix.
The good thing with trucking is you could find a company that will provide training for you so long as you drive for them for a certain period of time. 
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