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Author Topic: Proper Dress and Behavoir of a RE Investor  (Read 21460 times)

Offline Rich_in_CT

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Re: Proper Dress and Behavoir of a RE Investor
« Reply #30 on: August 27, 2007, 10:33:12 am »
People though they claim not to be racist tend to treat individuals of a certain ethnicity a certain way, that's life.  On Long Island where some of Frank's properties are you can bet a minority poking around would get more attention than a caucasian doing the same thing......it's a fact of life.  While people nowadays tend to be more tolerant of other races than they may have been 30 years ago predjudices still remain and people still act and react colored at least in part by those predjudices.  You might think Frank is being completely nuts in his observations but he's not that far off base from reality.

I go into Jamaican neighborhoods where most wouldn't dare tread to get food and I get the same treatment Frank gets in affluent white neighborhoods......"who are you and what are you doing here?" looks.  Racism is still everywhere, its just not as overt as it used to be.

Offline propertymanager

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Re: Proper Dress and Behavoir of a RE Investor
« Reply #31 on: August 28, 2007, 05:33:01 am »
I agree Rich.  People dress, and should dress, to reflect their personality and occupation.  You can often judge someone by the way they look and the way they are dressed.  In our area, when you see people wearing baggy pants that require one hand to hold them up, they are saying that they are a druggie and a loser and I'm not renting to them.  When someone shows up with K I L L tattooed on their knuckles, they are showing their personality and I'm certainly NOT renting to them.  I judge people by the way the look all the time and I can spot a drug dealer by their look from a block away.  The way people dress says a lot about them.

Frank is absolutely right  -  your dress says a lot about you.

Mike
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This No-Hype, No-Nonsense Book is a step by step course in making money and building wealth with rental properties!  Everything from buying properties at a discount to dealing with terrible tenants.  Now In Paperback!

Offline jparkx1

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Re: Proper Dress and Behavoir of a RE Investor
« Reply #32 on: August 28, 2007, 08:59:58 am »
It's true that all of us judge people based on their physical appearance right away.  However, I don't think people should stick to that bias unless they have something to support their initial claims.  Times are different; I won't immediately think if someone had baggy pants on that he'd be a menace and unreliable as a tenant.  It's true you guys could've had your share of problems with "these types" but should take it as a person by person case.  If a person wants to rent from you, do all the necessary credit/background/etc. checks and see if there's a reason why you shouldn't rent to them.

I don't know if it's more of an elder's way of thinking (old-fashioned, no disrespect), but the younger generation is fused with urban culture nowadays and you just won't know if that person not dressed conservatively might be a UCLA student, majoring in business economics taking a break from school to study real estate investing.

Offline Rich_in_CT

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Re: Proper Dress and Behavoir of a RE Investor
« Reply #33 on: August 28, 2007, 09:16:13 am »
It's true that all of us judge people based on their physical appearance right away.  However, I don't think people should stick to that bias unless they have something to support their initial claims.  Times are different; I won't immediately think if someone had baggy pants on that he'd be a menace and unreliable as a tenant.  It's true you guys could've had your share of problems with "these types" but should take it as a person by person case.  If a person wants to rent from you, do all the necessary credit/background/etc. checks and see if there's a reason why you shouldn't rent to them.

I don't know if it's more of an elder's way of thinking (old-fashioned, no disrespect), but the younger generation is fused with urban culture nowadays and you just won't know if that person not dressed conservatively might be a UCLA student, majoring in business economics taking a break from school to study real estate investing.
I'm with Mike on this one, I can spot a drug dealer 2 blocks away.  There is a big difference between those that wear "hip-hop" wear and the obvious drug dealers.  I can drive through a neighborhood that is 100% "urban" clothing and spot drug dealers, they make themselves obvious for a reason not unlike McDonalds....to keep customers coming to them.   Obviously if they wear Rocawear jeans you can't decide not to rent to them in an urban environment as 96% of the residents of that neighborhood dress like that.  I don't see any point in doing further screening if you see obvious signs that they are a crackhead, dealer, or other degenerate lifetime loser.

And as far as your comment about an elder's viewpoint.....I'm 27 and 90% of the music I listen to is rap/hip hop, etc.  I'm not exactly a fuddy duddy old guy and I do know what's current with fashion.  I do however have a good degree of accuracy in quickly assessing people and their body language to tell what type of person they are. 

PS-  Despite my taste in music my clothing all fits, my underwear do not hang out and the waistline of my pants is squarely around my WAIST. 

Offline fadi

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Re: Proper Dress and Behavoir of a RE Investor
« Reply #34 on: August 28, 2007, 09:32:02 am »
heh I like the clarification in the PS. I also agree. My point of the post I made is that you don't have to get out of your way to look professional, and there is no specific dress code. You just need to look clean cut and presentable.

This is something that is hard to explain because I have seen people who dress well, yet they look so amateurish, and some dress in shorts and look professional. Haven't seen one with his underwear hanging out looking professional though. If thats their usual clothing style, then absolutely, change before you go visit clients.

I agree it is all in the body language and the overall fit and personality. I wear tshirts, jeans,..etc but I come across as a serious investor.
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Offline jparkx1

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Re: Proper Dress and Behavoir of a RE Investor
« Reply #35 on: August 28, 2007, 09:34:23 am »
Rich,

Pull your pants down a li'l, you're flooding man, lol.

Yeah, I see the point you're making.  And concerning the younger generation (I'm 24), I think we're better able to assess the differences between hiphop and crackhead.  But the point in discussion here was the proper dress and initial appearance of a person.  Obviously, if a person is dressed in ragged clothing and looks like they haven't slept in a while and shaking, you wouldn't rent to them.  I'm just saying if someone didn't have a conservative look, not to judge right away. 

Offline Frank Chin

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Re: Proper Dress and Behavoir of a RE Investor
« Reply #36 on: August 28, 2007, 10:49:51 am »

This is something that is hard to explain because I have seen people who dress well, yet they look so amateurish, and some dress in shorts and look professional. Haven't seen one with his underwear hanging out looking professional though. If thats their usual clothing style, then absolutely, change before you go visit clients.


OK, I have to admit it, I'm old, and never quite got the hang of "business casual".

I have of bunch of white or light blue shirts, that I had to get larger and larger collars over the years, I just slip it on, and if I need the professional look, slip a tie on, and I'm done. Maybe in this day and age, overdressed.

But it's 123, I'm done.

When I tried the business casual though, I look more like an aged hippie on the way to the disco. Someone will get a good laugh.

When I go to work on my rental, I wear my jeans and a pullover top to be ready to tale care of problems. Not exactly the outfit that inspires confidence looking like an investor.

But because of the increased use of business casual, and that I'm older, with gray hair and all, I don't have that "Bill Gates" geeky look that I used to look like out of my professional duds, so I don't look as bad and geeky as before .

I noticed when the manager of the local Washington Mutual visited my business, they now have a "casual uniform", sort of a green pullover top with the banks' name monogrammed on the shirt pocket. At Chase, the bank tellers got these outfits, in blue, but not the officers, still with suit and tie. At Citibank, the teller are still in white shirt and tie.

I guess, bottomline is, business casual may look more right on some than on others.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2007, 11:21:43 am by Frank Chin »

Offline 4freedom

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Re: Proper Dress and Behavoir of a RE Investor
« Reply #37 on: August 28, 2007, 02:28:20 pm »
As a newbie, this topic really caught my interest. And to help you get a better picture as to WHY this topic grabbed me: I am a non-white, 40-something WOMAN, often mistaken for male (short hair and muscular build). I live in jeans and sneakers. While I was in the IT field, my mode of dress was business casual, usually Dockers and button down. I saw the responses I got during interviews (I did mostly contract work and had to do interviews all the time). I knew my dress took some by surprise, but my general personality, professional manner and attitude were what got me the jobs.

 Now that I have become interested in RE, it occurred to me that where I live and intend to be doing drive-bys and looking around, I might run into several of the issues some of you have talked about. On the phone, I might be able to get far. In person, I may put people off a bit. It didn't stop me before; I could talk my way through and get what I was after. I'm hoping this will still be the case.

Thanks for the input and voices of experience.


Offline buffinvestor

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Re: Proper Dress and Behavoir of a RE Investor
« Reply #38 on: August 29, 2007, 03:06:03 pm »
Rich's quote from above:   90% of the music I listen to is rap/hip hop, etc. 

I can't help myself here....Just can't help it...

Rich - Correction, with all due respect....Rap isn't music....It's, well, crap....It's for people who don't know how to sing...

Try some Alicia Keys...Now, THAT'S music!!

 :bobble

Offline Frank Chin

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Re: Proper Dress and Behavoir of a RE Investor
« Reply #39 on: August 30, 2007, 06:07:08 am »
As a newbie, this topic really caught my interest. And to help you get a better picture as to WHY this topic grabbed me: I am a non-white, 40-something WOMAN, often mistaken for male (short hair and muscular build). I live in jeans and sneakers.

Nice to hear from a minority women.

Being a minoirty investor, the issues of safety is one on the top of my mind, in vew of the need to visit different geographic areas. In high crime areas, the concern is criminal residents, in affluent areas, the concern the "fear" by the residents of visitors. and possible over reaction.

Female realtors are quite common, and nowadays. I believe they out number their male counterparts. I see "husiness causal as the norm, i.e. no jeans and sneakers. I still see realtors, both male and female bring clients in jeans and sneakers. Maybe I'm old fashioned, but feel it's somewhat disrespectful.

My wife and I used to take turns doing open house showings for rentals. Then, a dozen years ago, we did one where the former tenant hasn't moved, a young couple with a new baby, the husband a police officer. Since the officers' wife was a stay at home mom at that point, my wife figured she'll have some company for the open house.

As it turned out, the officer husband took time off to join them, wearing his gun holster with a gun. It was hilarious as he also wore an apron cleaning the bathroom and kitchen that day. With his tree truck sized arms. It was an inconguous sight indeed.

Talk about paronoid, we thought he overreated, lost his marbles. But he told us if we only know what he knew. he's seen it all, and for open houses, you just don't know if the next guy coming in the door is a serial rapist or murderer, better be safe than sorry. Then we read stories of a female realtor found murdered in an empty house.

Thereafter, I've done most of the open houses, both for safety reasons, and because the wife feels I have a better gut feeling picking tenants. Still, a lone woman, in an empty house, with strangers of all types coming by, gives me pause.

This contrasts with realty offices, where customers are known and qualified, then goes out with the realtor, the risks lower.

I know there are many female REI out there these days, and perhaps a few minority females, and I always wonder how they feel about and handle the safety issue.

I know "propertymanager" wears a gun, but here in the NY area, it's difficult to get a permit, And women often keep guns in a purse, when they carry one, so it may not be that accessible when needed quickly.

 
« Last Edit: August 30, 2007, 07:40:49 am by Frank Chin »

Offline propertymanager

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Re: Proper Dress and Behavoir of a RE Investor
« Reply #40 on: August 30, 2007, 07:52:44 am »
Frank,

It is a dangerous world, especially when dealing with low income tenants.  It is amazing to me that there are such large numbers of criminals in the ranks of low income renters.  In my business, we decline more applicants due to their criminal background than for any other reason. 

One of the things I do to avoid direct contact with the worst criminals is to screen all potential applicants on the phone.  I tell all potential applicants our screening criteria on the telephone so that I don't even have to meet the unqualified.  That not only helps me avoid meeting most criminals, but it also saves me time with wasted showings. 

Just a few days ago, I met a young couple at my 3 bedroom house that is for rent.  They liked the house and wanted to rent it.  I again told them our screening criteria, at which point the man became somewhat agitated.  As it turns out, he had just gotten out of prison for a felony.  When I told him that I didn't rent to felons, he became upset.  I got them out of the house without incident, but you never know which one of these drugged up felons is going to become violent.  That is why I always carry my handgun when working.  Better safe than sorry!

Mike

www.1MinuteToRentalPropertyRichs.com 
This No-Hype, No-Nonsense Book is a step by step course in making money and building wealth with rental properties!  Everything from buying properties at a discount to dealing with terrible tenants.  Now In Paperback!

 




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